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Meeting House - 1853

Virtual Tour > Meeting House

The Meeting House sits at the southeast corner of Main and Fifth Streets in Zoar Village.

This was actually the third meeting house built in the village. It is a beautiful structure of red brick and sandstone. The bricks were made in Zoar and the stone hewn in the Zoarites’ own quarries. The plans were drawn by Joseph Bimeler who died the year it was built, never seeing its completion.

For two years after the dissolution of the Society in 1898, the church stood silent until arrangements could be made for a denomination to take over. Two were considered, and in 1901, the Evangelical church received the charge.

This building remains as beautiful now as when it was built. Much of the materials for this building were produced in Zoar, and most of the windows are made of the original wavy glass. Little has been changed in terms of the interior of the Meeting House. As you enter the church, you will see the very simply designed benches (or pews), all Zoar-made. The church seats about one hundred people. At the west wall is the bell rope, which rings the unusual bell in the tower, or cupola, adorning the structure.

It is said that when the Meeting House was built, those in charged wished to have something different in the way of a bell. It was decided that when the bell was cast, they would melt silver dollars and mix them with the ore. The bell does have a unique sound, and can still be heard every Sunday morning, call members of the congregation to worship.

The beautiful pipe organ, purchased from a company in Cleveland in 1872, is still in the building and continues to be used for regular services, weddings and special events.

The Meeting House is now the Zoar United Church of Christ.

 

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